Nissan and Toyota Expand Takata-Related Recall to 6.5 Million More Vehicles

ABC World News (5/13, story 11, 0:20, Muir, 5.84M) reported that Nissan and Toyota expanded “that massive recall over defective air bags – 6.5 million vehicles, those air bags made by the embattled manufacturer Takata. This time, fears that the air bags will rupture in a crash.” The AP (5/14, Kageyama) reports Toyota said Wednesday that it would recall nearly five million “more vehicles globally for the air bag inflator problem.” About 637,000 are in the US. The recall “affects 35 models globally, including the Corolla subcompact, RAV4 sport utility vehicle and Tundra pickup, produced from March 2003 through November 2007.”
USA Today (5/14, Woodyard, Healey, 5.01M) reported the latest recalls “show the Takata bag problem continues to deepen.” NHTSA is fining Takata “$14,000 a day for failing to cooperate regarding its air bags in which the inflators can explode with too much force and spew shrapnel.” Five US deaths have been “blamed on faulty Takata bags.”
The New York Times (5/14, Tabuchi, Soble, Subscription Publication, 12.24M) reported “one source of concern has been the airbags’ propellant, ammonium nitrate, a cheap but powerful explosive that engineers say can destabilize if contaminated with moisture.” The inflator itself, “and whether it corrodes over time,” has also been a concern. The Times notes that NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said last month that Takata “was moving too slowly and his agency was reviewing options to speed up the recalls.”
The Los Angeles Times (5/14, 4.03M) reports that this is “different from an earlier problem with Takata air bag inflators that deployed with too much force, which has affected a range of automakers including Honda Motor Co., Chrysler, BMW and Ford Motor Co.”
Reuters (5/14, Kim, Saito), the Wall Street Journal (5/14, Fujikawa, Subscription Publication, 5.68M), and the Detroit Bureau (5/14) also have reports.

Share

Nissan Increases Altima Recall To 640,000

The Chicago (IL) Tribune (3/9, Undercoffler, 2.42M) reported that Nissan has increased the number of 2013 Altimas involved in last year’s October recall from 220,000 to 625,000 in the US and 15,000 in Canada due to “a flaw that can cause the hood to fly open while the car is being driven.” The Tribune reported that Nissan does not currently have a fix to the issue but will attempt to mitigate the defect with a plan to “inspect and lubricate the potentially defective secondary latches free of charge at dealerships and will be notifying owners of affected vehicles.” Nissan is not yet aware of any injuries or accidents related to the defect.

Share

Chrysler Recalls 703,000 Vehicles Because Of Ignition-Switch Problems

Bloomberg News (3/8, Plungis, 2.94M) reported on Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NV’s “second recall of 703,000 minivans and SUVs with a defective ignition switch that can rotate out of position,” a problem similar to “the faulty General Motors Co. part tied to dozens of deaths.” NHTSA announced that the recall affects several models from the 2008-2010 years.

Share

Jury Finds For Plaintiff In J&J Mesh Lawsuit

Bloomberg News (3/5, 2.94M) reported that a jury in California ordered Johnson & Johnson on Thursday “to pay $5.7 million to a woman who said one of the company’s Abbrevo vaginal-mesh implants eroded inside her, forcing her to have surgery, in the first verdict over that device.” In the first verdict “to find fault with the Abbrevo sling,” jurors determined that the product “was defectively designed and officials of J&J’s Ethicon unit failed to properly warn doctors and consumers about the device’s risks.”

Share

NHTSA Reports That GM And Honda Recalls Are Biggest In History

According to the USA Today (3/3, Healey, 10.32M), “two of the biggest auto recalls in history took place last year” citing the NHTSA summary of recall activity, referencing GM’s 5.8 million vehicle recall for faulty ignition switches and Honda’s 5.39 million vehicle recall for defective airbags. Fifty-seven deaths are linked to the GM defect so far, and could rise as more claims are evaluated. The Honda defect is linked to five deaths. The GM recall “provoked federal fines, lawsuits, government investigations, an embarrassingly candid internal probe at the automaker, Senate and House subcommittee hearings and an overhaul of how GM regards safety concerns.” The AP (3/3) reported that the two recalls make up “more than half of the record 64 million vehicles recalled last year.”

Share

Automobile Recalls Are Likely To Remain High in 2015

Relying on an automotive industry warranty and recall study from the financial advisory firm Stout, Risius and Ross, the Detroit Bureau (2/26) reported that automotive recalls in 2015 are likely to be higher than normal, though unlikely to reach 2014 figures. The Bureau adds that the forecast is unsurprising, because the new head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Mark Rosekind, “has already predicted it would happen,” as he hopes to double the size of the NHTSA investigative staff.

Share

Federal Regulators Want Dealers To Fix Recalled Vehicles

The AP (2/25, Krisher, Durbin) reported that currently, dealers and individual sellers are not legally required to repair recalled cars before the vehicle is sold. Sellers are not even obligated to notify buyers that a vehicle is subject to a recall. Later, the AP says that several attempts to pass legislation that requires dealers to fix recalled vehicles or “disclose problems have stalled under opposition from carmakers, auto dealers and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.” However, it adds that NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind and Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx are “making another push.” Rosekind is quoted as saying, “We cannot allow vehicles with potentially dangerous defects to leave used-car lots without the necessary repairs.”

Share

Great Advice From Consumer Reports

February 18, 2015 6:00 am • From the editors of Consumer Reports

In an ideal world, respectful treatment from health care providers would be the norm. In the real world, you may have to insist on it. Consumer Reports suggests increasing the odds of a good hospital experience with these strategies:
•Choose the right hospital. A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine linked low patient satisfaction with less-than-stellar hospital performance in areas such as pain control, discharge instructions and communicating about medication. And research in the American Journal of Managed Care showed that people who were satisfied with their care after a heart attack, heart failure or pneumonia were less likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days.
•Help providers see you as a person. Once you get to the hospital, chances are you won’t know many of the folks taking care of you. Reminding people that you are more than a diagnosis can change that. Bring in pictures, maybe one showing you playing golf or tennis. Add a personal detail when you describe your medical problems to a doctor.
•Invite your doctor to have a seat. In a recent study, Norwegian researchers created simulations in a hospital setting, using real doctors and actors as patients and comparing electronic devices with paper medical records. The patient actors thought the doctors were so busy with their devices that they shouldn’t interrupt to ask questions. If you experience that dynamic, you can change it and make it easier to communicate by inviting your doctor to sit down and have a conversation.
•Have your people with you. An advocate can help in a number of ways — for instance, making sure you are comfortable, getting information from the doctor or nurse, helping you make decisions about treatment and speaking for you if you aren’t able to speak for yourself.
•Know when errors tend to occur. In a new national Consumer Reports survey of 1,200 recently hospitalized people, patients who thought there weren’t enough nurses available were twice as likely to experience some kind of a medical error and 14 percent less likely to think they were always treated with dignity and respect. Shift changes can also create safety hazards, as can care transitions, such as moving from an intensive care unit to a hospital floor. If you know when and where errors are most likely to occur, you can make a special effort to have your advocate be present then.
•Find a “troubleshooter.” Navigating the hospital is much easier with an “insider” ally. You or a family member should introduce yourself to the head nurse on duty or seek out the nursing supervisor, attending physician or even a physical therapist or aide with whom you feel comfortable. Then, if something goes wrong, you will have already established a personal connection with someone who knows the system and can help.
•Be assertive and prepared, but always be courteous. Think about what you want to ask your doctors when they rush in for that early morning visit, and say it out loud a few times so that you get what you want from the encounter.
•Write things down. With doctors, nurses, technicians, medical students and social workers in and out of your hospital room, it can be very difficult to keep track of what is being done, especially when you are ill. Consumer Reports recommends listening to what they have to say, asking questions and taking notes.
•If you don’t understand something, ask again. Medicine is complicated stuff, and sometimes doctors forget you haven’t studied it. “This is so much a part of their lives and their vocabulary. Sometimes they rush through an explanation without realizing that the person in front of them has no clue how to interpret what they just said,” says communications specialist Carolyn Thomas. “I simply raise a hand in the ‘stop’ position, and politely remind them that I haven’t been to medical school, so please slow down and translate.”

Share

General Motors Expands Recall Of Vehicles In US And Canada For Power Steering Problems.

The New York Times (2/15, Jensen, Subscription Publication, 9.97M) reported that General Motors issued a recall for “more than 81,000 cars because their power steering systems could suddenly fail, making the vehicles harder to turn,” in what is a follow-up to the recall of 1.3 million vehicles last March. According to the story, about 11,000 of the vehicles are in Canada, and GM “said it was recalling the additional vehicles after an inquiry last April by Transport Canada, that country’s counterpart to the N.H.T.S.A.”
Bloomberg News (2/15, Barinka, 2.94M) reports that GM will alert owners of vehicles with the defect “and replace the torque sensor assembly without charging for the fixes.” In a letter, NHTSA recall management chief Jennifer Timian said, “If power steering assist is lost, greater driver effort would be required to steer the vehicle at low speeds, increasing the risk of a crash.”
The Wall Street Journal (2/15, Bennett, Subscription Publication, 5.67M) also reports.

Share

NHTSA’s Daily Fines For Takata Corp.

The Transportation Department announced that it would start fining Takata Corp. $14,000 per day for violating two Department of Transportation orders. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx made statements in Richmond, Virginia on the final leg of his Grow America Express bus tour through the Southeast, while NHTSA sent Takata a letter about its failure to cooperate with the Department throughout the Federal investigation into the company’s defective airbags. The story is receiving extensive national coverage in the top newspapers and has a broad distribution in wire reports, as well as regional outlets and local TV broadcasts, although national broadcasts coverage was lacking. The DOT decision is being treated as an “escalation,” as the New York Times and the Associated Press put it, in the Takata investigation, an “aggressive” move, to quote Bloomberg News.
The New York Times (2/21, Tabuchi, Ivory, Subscription Publication, 9.97M) reports, the NHTSA letter to Takata accused the company of not reacting “fully or truthfully” to the DOT orders to hand over documents about the airbags and burying “information that it is legally obligated to supply,” as well as not “being cooperative in aiding N.H.T.S.A.’s ongoing investigation of a potentially serious safety defect.” Takata denied that it was circumventing or stalling in the investigation. The New York Times points out, too, that Foxx used the penalties as a talking point in “promoting stronger auto safety rules.”
Bloomberg News (2/21, Plungis, 2.94M) reports that Foxx stated, “We are using the maximum available penalty until Takata finds itself in compliance,” adding that “We will not tolerate this.” NHTSA Administrator Mark Rosekind said that transportation officials “still don’t know the root cause” of the airbag defect. According to the story, the penalties bring up the question of “how transparent and proactive automakers are when it comes to dealing with potential safety defects,” which is why the Transportation Department is requesting more resources from Congress. Additionally, the Administration wants to give NHTSA the ability to fine automakers up to $300 million.
Foxx stated, “Safety is a shared responsibility and Takata’s failure to fully cooperate with our investigation is unacceptable and will not be tolerated,” Reuters (2/21, Chiacu) reports.
The AP (2/21, Lowy, Krisher) reports, the defective airbag inflators are “in cars made by 10 companies.” This new “escalation in the public fight between NHTSA and Takata” also included a warning in the letter that Takata employees could face depositions or other court action from the Justice Department.
The Wall Street Journal (2/21, Spector, Subscription Publication, 5.67M) points out that the fine is twice as much as what DOT made General Motors pay last year for its own recall scandal. NHTSA’s letter to Takata referred to a meeting with the company on February 4 where Takata was supposed to explain the documents it had submitted, claiming that the meeting yielded no results.
Takata faulty airbags continue to have ramifications for Honda. USA Today (2/23, 10.32M) reports “Honda has joined other automakers in recalling cars with Takata air bags” and 17 million airbags from all brands have been recalled since 2008. USA Today says “air bag issues shows no signs of going away anytime soon” as on Friday, Federal officials announced they will “levy fines of $14,000 a day against Takata for refusing to cooperate with a probe” by the NHTSA.
The AP (2/23, Kurtenbach) reports US regulators have “fined Honda $70 million, which was the largest civil penalty levied against an automaker, for not reporting” 1,729 complaints that its vehicles caused injuries and deaths, and also for failing to report warranty claims. The AP also says Takata airbag maker refused the NHTSA’s “demand to issue a nationwide recall of driver’s side air bag inflators, though automakers have recalled the cars on their own.”
Bloomberg News (2/23, Ma, 2.94M) reports “Honda Motor Co.’s Takanobu Ito will step aside as president of Japan’s third-largest carmaker after quality lapses led to record vehicle recalls last year.”
Jaguar Land Rover puts out recall on tens of thousands of vehicles for air bags defect. ABC News (2/21, 3.41M) reported online that Jaguar Land Rover North America issued a recall on “61,793 vehicles because the front, passenger-side air bag may be disabled if a lightweight adult sits in the seat,” affecting certain Range Rover vehicles between the 2013 and 2015 model years.
The AP (2/22) reports with similar coverage.

Share